Apartment Hunting Resources

We have a wealth of resources to help you make your move easier than you could imagine. Whether you’re just starting to think about your move or you’re ready to book an appointment, these resources will help you get started.

  • Apartment Therapy – Helps people make their homes more beautiful, organized and healthy by connecting them to a wealth of resources, ideas and community online.
  • How to Rent in New York City – a useful resource about renting, written by a former real estate salesperson and the New York Times and examiner.com expert on real estate rentals. The site also has many no-fee rental listings.

If you are thinking about buying and/or making changes to your property – we recommend the following local businesses.

  • J. Christopher Interiors – Frank Rasizzi – Frank’s company specializes in all kinds of office and apartment or condo renovations in New York City, including bathroom renovations, kitchen renovations, lobby renovations, or apartment combinations. The family-owned company that has over 45 years of experience in construction provides the full range of services, from initial planning and design, to all aspects of the construction and completion.
  • Lynn Herlihy Architecture Plus Design – Lynn is a residential and commercial architect and interior designer who is talented at creating beautiful spaces that reflect the true personality of her clients. She works on projects as small as a single room to as large as a whole townhouse or commercial or office space. She is passionate about designing spaces that meet her client’s unique needs.
  • Greenberg & Wolff – Andrea Wolff – Andrea is a real estate attorney who is passionate about helping her clients ensure that they are making smart decisions when it comes to buying a home. She is known for providing attentive service and being available to her clients.

~Lenny

[Photo courtesy of Paul Kirk at Paul Kirk Galleries]

How Much Will My Move Cost?

How much will my move cost is one of the most common questions that our customers ask us. And of course, we aim to give them as precise an estimate as we possibly can. The best way to get an accurate estimate for your moving costs is to schedule one of our estimators to come to your place, meet you, and see what’s there to be moved.

If you’d like to start with a more general overview, we can also do that if you give us as much information as you can about your move. Most of what we list here would be discussed during an in-person estimate.

Here is what we typically need to know:

  • Is this a business of residential move?
  • What kind of building are you moving from? And what kind of building is your new one?
    • Are they walk-ups or elevator buildings?
    • Does service access include a ramp, flight of stairs, or the required use of multiple elevators?
  • Will you be needing short- or long-term storage in addition to moving services?
  • Do your buildings have any restrictions around when you can move?
    • For example, are moving hours restricted to week days, or are weekends OK too?
    • Do you need to reserve an elevator?
    • Will the movers need to provide a certificate of insurance?
  • Will you pack your own boxes, or would you like movers to pack for you?
  • How many rooms of belongings do you have? Is there a basement storage area?
  • How many people are living or working there?
  • How long have you been at your present space?
  • Are there any items to be moved that will require special handling (i.e., piano, major appliances, art, mirrors, computers, office partitions, console printers, safes)?
  • Are there any other special considerations like needing a child’s room set up first, specific placement of work stations, desks, shelving, etc.?

Of course, all of this is without talking about the furniture you have. We will want an idea of that, too.

A good mover will ask about these things, either in person, or on the phone.  As you can see, doing this by email will quickly get tedious.

While we gain a sense of the scale of your move, you will get a sense of the importance we place on understanding you so we can best work together.

Flat Rate May Deliver Cut Rate Quality

Why Flat Rate Moving Services May Deliver Cut Rate Quality

Last week, we answered one of the most common questions we get: How much will my move cost? This week we’re answering another question customers often ask us: Why doesn’t Rainbow Movers offer flat rates for our services?

One of the biggest reasons is because we believe we can offer excellent customer service at a fair price and still pay a living wage to our employees.

Moving companies that offer flat rates often pay their movers a percentage of what they charge rather than an hourly wage.  If the flat rate is estimated well, everything may turn out OK for the movers.

But if the flat rate is meant to undercut the realistic estimates of other movers (which is often the case), the employees of the flat rate company will suffer.  Only generous tips from customers will make up for lost wages.  Unfortunately, movers don’t always get good tips.  Crews can end up working at or under minimum wage.

Because of this, flat rate moving companies don’t often have experienced crews who are loyal to the company. Instead, they’re more likely to have less experienced guys on their trucks who may also be less concerned about the quality of their work.

In this situation, the movers also understand that the more time they spend on a job the lower their hourly rate will be.  For the movers to rush the job may mean that your delicate belongings may not be handled so delicately.

The advantage of working with Rainbow Movers is that we give you an honest and realistic job estimate, based on a clear discussion of the conditions of each move. In most cases, we will guarantee that the job will not go over the estimate. We hope it will end up costing less, and often it does.  But on occasions where the conditions change, our customers understand and appreciate that even though their costs will change as well, the quality of our work will not.

Here is a scenario where our approach led to a better result:

Recently, a repeat customer called us and asked us for an estimate to move a relative’s bedroom furniture from one house to another, and then some things from that 2nd house to her own house. We estimated the costs based on this information.

When we got to the relative’s place, we found out that instead of just moving bedroom furniture, we were being asked to move most of the furniture in the house, and none of the things in and on the furniture were packed.  And another delivery location was added for a few items after the delivery to our customer.   Our crew notified our office, and we contacted the customer.  All agreed we could handle the changes.

Our guys, who have worked with us for decades, did the job well and were able to make all the deliveries in an unexpectedly long day.  Had we all known what would have been involved, we’d have scheduled a larger crew, the movers and our customer could have gone to bed at a reasonable hour, and the cost would have been the same.

Because the movers had experience working together, they could confidently rely on each other.  The unexpected changes increased the costs to our customer, but also increased her appreciation for our work.